Potential Fiscal and Revenue Options for the Walker-Mallott Administration

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The Walker-Mallott administration has tasked the Department of Revenue (Department) with identifying potential short, medium and long-terms revenue options in order to help transition Alaska out of its current fiscal situation. Alaska North Slope (ANS) oil prices declined from over $100 in August 2014, to a monthly average of under $50 in January 2015, before recently recovering to the $60 range in early May 2015

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ICICI Bank

ICICI Bank Ltd (NYSE:IBN) had consolidated total assets of US$ 138.7 billion at March 31, 2016. ICICI Bank's subsidiaries include India's leading private sector insurance companies and among its largest securities brokerage firms, mutual funds and private equity firms. ICICI Bank's presence currently spans 17 countries, including India.

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How to Utilize Open Banking Opportunities in 2020

Article | April 27, 2020

Everyone wants to build a creamier, faster, and more efficient financial services journey — which in 2020 is not a point of controversy or friction. Today, customer demand is touching peaks. It is customer demand that forces businesses come out of their silos and collaborate with others to create products and services that are open-source, non-proprietary, and do not lock down users into an ecosystem. The launch of Open Banking is initiated to fundamentally change the way consumers, businesses, and banks pay and get paid, and how they maintain their data. The foundation of a unified Application Programming Interface, or API, across financial institutions, constitutes a foundation in which data can be seamlessly and securely shared right away. While open banking is in the initial stages of its evolution, many assume this trend to expedite and reshape the banking industry in significant ways. Thanks to open banking developments around the world, customers are becoming more informed of the essential value of their information and are increasingly seeking more command over their financial data. Table of Contents •Why is Open Banking Important? •How Does Open Banking Work? •Open banking in United States •The Wave of Change in Payment Arena •Cloud-based Processing Services •Conclusion Why is Open Banking Important? The most valuable asset in the 2020 world is data, and banking data is the finest of the crop, as it facilitates insight into how consumers and businesses are employing money, saving, and acquiring debt. The data has got value and the data that the bank holds and the customers, belongs to the customer and not to the bank, that’s a fundamental realism or premise that the government has is writ large in European legislation. You will be pestered by its called GDPR but fundamentally enshrines the fact that the data belongs to you, the consumer or to the SME, not to the financial institution. And if you as a consumer want to use that information to get access to better products and better services, it’s entirely your right to do so. That’s what open banking is trying to deliver. It holds the promise of making finance more convenient, better tailored and fundamentally smarter. From industry point of view, open banking promises to lower the barriers to entry to financial services and lower the barriers to innovation in financial services. That’s why it is so exciting for many of the fintechs. Open Banking delivers enormous opportunities in 2020, for the fintech ecosystem that goes beyond necessary to invigorate customer relationships and transform businesses. Through ecosystem partners, banks can enter customer journeys earlier than before and create added value to expertly serve enduring customers as well as attract new ones. Customers foresee seamless digital experiences, and platform-based business models, that are a quintessential element of the digital economy. When embracing the opportunities Open Banking brings, banks can leverage the ability, speed, effectiveness, and innovativeness of startups to enhance their product and service offerings. Banks also have access to other banks’ data. By genuinely performing multi-banking services, they can drag competitors’ customers and spread awareness of their brand. How Does Open Banking Work? Let’s put this into three: • What the banks do • How you get registered • What the customer sees The banks have put into places API’s, this means they have made huge technology decisions to expose customer data and access the data from other third parties. For open banking to work, you have to be governed by the OBIE rules. The OBIE is open banking implementation entity and you can either be an AISP or a PISP that sits under the OBIE. The AISP essentially means you are an account information services provider and PISP means you are payment initiation services provider. One means you can aggregate transaction data and customer data, the other means the payments that you can initiate from your third party, from your bank. The third element to this is TSP, a technology service provider. And they basically provide all the rails between the banks and between third parties to make sure that this whole system runs right. From the consumer perspective, at the end, it gives them the ability to share their data with third parties but crucially have the permissioning power to be able to do that. An AISP can condense reams of bank account statement data and pass it to the customer in a single interface, making it ideal for treasurers of multi-banked organizations. Payment service users – whether they are individuals or businesses, can guide their banks or payment service providers to share their bank balance and transaction data with regulated AISPs. To display this information on a user-friendly dashboard, the AISP can convert all this transaction data into the expected format and send it to the customer’s ERP or Treasury Management System. Before the initiation of Open Banking, businesses and consumers were logging into each bank individually to initiate payments, using various workflows and security etiquettes. With the arrival of Open Banking, individuals or businesses are now equipped to mandate their multiple banks or payment service providers to receive payment instructions via their PISP’s app. Learn more: Open banking in the same language Open banking in United States According to Deloitte Insights, The open data revolution is most obvious in Australia, the United Kingdom, and other countries in the European Union. Each has distinct regulations that require banks to share customer data with third-party providers as per customers’ instructions. Other countries, such as Canada, Japan, and Singapore, are also considering similar regulations. Australia, however, has taken it a step further: It has gone beyond the financial services sector, applying an expansive set of rules on consumer data rights and data-sharing to other industries as well. We do not know yet whether this will be a model for other countries, although, in the United Kingdom, similar efforts are underway. While the open banking model in the United States may take a different path, US banks can learn valuable lessons by looking at how it has been implemented in more regulatory-driven environments. Bank leaders may find it particularly helpful to review how different regions set technical and customer experience standards for data-sharing. To date, there are no signs that new open banking regulations are being developed in the United States. Learn more: Open banking model strategy The Wave of Change in Payment Arena One interesting example of the innovation encouraged by Open Banking is HSBC’s Connect Money application. This application enables customers to view all their accounts within single application-even if those accounts are scattered across different banks. According to an article by Accenture "How Open Banking is Catalyzing Payments Change" Connect Money demonstrates one of the most fascinating features of Open Banking. Many Open Banking products and services are subject to “network effects”—they become more valuable as more banks participate. If Connect Money allowed customers to track only HSBC accounts, it might have been somewhat useful. The fact that the app connects across many banks is what makes it powerful. This aspect of Open Banking can also make it easier for new entrants to grow and gain purchase in the market since more access to data means more opportunities to create value for customers. In the payments platform, Open Banking is advantageous to small and medium-sized businesses (SMEs). This is because it facilitates account aggregation, better financial management, easier credit checking of customers, and the unification of lending and accounting applications. With Open Banking, SMEs can receive and make payments using different platforms with better clarity and best momentum. Open Banking payments are validated instantly between consumers and their banks. This means the chargebacks that merchants must pay because of fraud or rejected payments becomes zero. This offers plentiful savings for all merchants. Payments powered by Open Banking also give real-time credit transfers, confirming the payment and empowering merchants to ship the product immediately. Cloud-based Processing Services Open Banking also maintains cloud-based processing services- a compelling alternative for decentralizing processing and encouraging payments innovation. The benefit includes: • More economical costs • More regular compliance maintenance • Advanced enterprise agility • The capacity to flex volumes quickly The new payment option, called IATA Pay, provides customers more extensive selection of payment methods when buying airline tickets. The most popular services that are being worked in 2020 covers Request to Pay and P2P payments services. We can anticipate seeing many more in the following years. Conclusion Open Banking scales to opportunities preferably, then threats. Done perfectly, banks can flourish, encouraging their customer franchises and brand, securing a defined culture, and fostering business through open collaboration with the world beyond financial services. We are witnessing the initial stages of a seismic industry migration that will come into full power over the next five years. The evolution of innovations with the potential to force simplicity and enhance flexibility is turning a once complicated web of financial institutions into centralized tools to maximize value creation. Open Banking scales to opportunities preferably, then threats. Done perfectly, banks can flourish, encouraging their customer franchises and brand, securing a defined culture, and fostering business through open collaboration with the world beyond financial services. Consequently, any bank that needs to stay consistent in 2030 must begin to design their Open Banking strategy immediately.

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Three Ways to Thrive in a Technology-Driven Financial Industry

Article | April 27, 2020

The banking and financial industry is changing at a blinding pace. Advancements in mobile payments, digital currencies, blockchain and innovative lending strategies are causing a radical shift and have challenged nearly every established convention. These new financial technologies (known collectively as “fintech”) are giving rise to new jobs while also changing existing roles and completely displacing some positions in the industry.

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A bank account - A concept of the past

Article | April 27, 2020

Almost every recent article written about banking starts with the statement that the banking industry is being disrupted by new competitors, new innovations and new technologies. Although this statement is definitely true, the extend of the disruption can still be debated. Even the most innovative neo-banks still work with bank (current, saving, term and investment) accounts, cards (credit and debit), traditional credits, existing payment infrastructure… The user experience surrounding the origination and servicing of these products has dramatically improved (and will continue to evolve), but the underlying banking products are not really disrupted.

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How to Boost Digital Banking Amid Coronavirus

Article | April 27, 2020

Banks have an Essential Role to Play as Systemic Stabilizers. COVID 19 has created disruptive economic fallout within human society across all religions/races/geographies/countries/continents. The path ahead is hence a dangerous one, driven by epidemiological uncertainty. While this situation is occurring for the first time in human history, this has also been an eye-opener to have a more comprehensive look at the way we operate. The footfalls of branch banking have decreased to a large extent, and banks have urged customers to use digital channels. Table of Contents • COVID 19- An Accelerant to Digital Transformation • How to Increase Digital Banking Adoption - Start with a comprehensive plan - Keep employees morale up to get back on solid ground - Leverage digital and traditional channels - Enable Seamless Customer Experience • Conclusion COVID 19- An Accelerant to Digital Transformation The coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak is indirectly promoting digital transformation, as many service providers, including banks, have significantly decreased or even closed their offline services, asking their customers to adopt the digital banking for any assistance. This trend is resulting in speeding up digital transformation. But, the question here is, are customers ready for this drastic change? Yes, slowly yet firmly, Banks are witnessing customers picking up services that have distinguished digital capabilities. The mechanics of customer interaction has quickly shifted from physical handshakes to virtual communication over personal & extensive digital channels. Learn more: https://capital.report/blogs/6-digital-banking-best-practices-during-the-covid-19-outbreak/8287 Consultant McKinsey & Co, in an article titled Leadership in the time of coronavirus: COVID-19 response and implications for the banks, reports that Banks have already taken a series of actions in reaction to the spread of COVID-19. Common steps we’ve seen include establishing a central task force, curtailing travel, suspending large-scale gatherings, segregating teams, making arrangements for teleworking, and refreshing external-vendor-interaction policies. It also highlights some of the fundamental changes banking organizations are going to need to make in the way they do business. Workplace dynamics and talent management, already evolving in a digitizing world, maybe durably changed after an extended period of remote working,” it says. “Likewise, customer routines and expectations may also shift further in meaningful proportions, both in terms of digital adaptation and the expectation for proactive communication and care. How to Increase Digital Banking Adoption Digital is not a destination but it's a journey with more and more innovations and discoveries happening across multiple industries. But with COVID 19, it is a forced change for human society to adapt to a digital and contactless mechanism for business transactions between individuals or companies across the border (B2B, B2C, B2G, G2G, etc). The countries which are adopting this methodology are more likely to succeed in the new digital paradigm post-Covid 19. Below are some simple steps you can use to increase customer engagement with digital banking: Start with a comprehensive plan To increase awareness of your digital banking platform, it is always essential, to begin with, a first cut action plan. In the current crisis, there are immediate actions banks can take to help retail and small business customers, support the use of digital channels so that customers can bank from home. In the United States, many banks struggle to increase digital adoption among their customers; for example, nearly half of banking customers either never use their mobile app or do so infrequently. According to McKinsey& Company, In the United States, the most satisfied customers use digital multiple times per week, the second-most satisfied customers do not use digital at all. The least satisfied banking customers are those who use digital tools infrequently, less than once per month. This is because customers go through a learning curve as they adopt digital tools, and most banks under-support their customers in the adoption journey. In the current environment, banks should redouble their efforts to smooth customers’ transition to digital. Here’s how: • Easy-to-find and clear communication • segment-specific campaigns • remote coaching and advice, • And unified experiences across each journey, such as written and video explanations for how to accomplish specific digital tasks, along with ways to try them out. Banking services that involve branch interaction, digital tools can still play an important role by providing information on adjusted hours, essential services, reduced staff numbers, heightened safety precautions, social-distancing measures, and digitally-enabled queuing. Keep employees morale up to get back on solid ground One of the first things that can go for a toss in such challenging times is the morale of employees. It is natural for employees to feel frustrated. The uncertainty of the company's future, the fear of recession, and uncertainty around jobs can damage motivation, productivity, and can create a lot of fear among employees. This entails bank managers to set precise directions for remote teams that are pursuing common goals. Bank managers should also take this opportunity to delegate and empower their employees for decision making. Both intrinsic and extrinsic motivation through rewards, clear spans of control, and meaningful appreciation can go a long way in supporting employee morale. A vital portion of the employees is working from home facing operational challenges, such as internet-bandwidth issues, network connectivity, technology glitches, and childcare priorities. Following practices could help these banks perform a more effective distributed-work environment: According to McKinsey &Company, following practices could help these banks perform a more effective distributed-work environment: • Enable technology setup and infrastructure for remote work. • Supporting remote-work technology and infrastructure • Assisting employees with home-office setup • Ensuring adequate VPN bandwidth • Providing remote application access • Adopting a suite of digital tools that facilitate effective communication, and decision making, such as videoconferencing, file sharing, real-time communication, coediting, and task management, and • Ensuring that agents have the necessary tools and resources to handle calls from home while maintaining customer-data-confidentiality standards. With all these features, it is also critical to ensure that agents are well-equipped with the necessary tools and resources to handle calls from home while maintaining customer-data-confidentiality standards. Leverage digital and traditional channels The more frequently a person sees a message, and in more places, the more likely they are to engage and take action. Banks need to maximize awareness by promoting their message across channels. Promote it in their branch and online, on ATM screens and in the call center. Banks can also find ways to cross-promote digital banking. For example, during the new account opening process, it should encourage consumers to enroll in online banking. Or, if a bank or credit union is doing a credit card promotion, they can use it as an opportunity to cross-promote its mobile app. Enable Seamless Customer Experience For banks, spending on customer experience was essential before the current crisis, both from a “good business” perspective and a “good bank” perspective. Now, these aspects are even more relevant. It is highly important for banks to make their genuine concern for their customers clear and to make customer interactions with the bank as easy as possible. COVID-19 has brought customers already under health and financial stress. They will need ready access to bank products and services. It is now more important, then, to reach customers through digital channels, stay connected through innovative communication channels, meet the needs of vulnerable populations, and stabilize critical infrastructure. • Banks should encourage more customers to use remote channels and digital products whenever possible. • Enhancing current digital offerings, identifying key functionalities, that can be improved quickly • Speeding up the procedure to increase limits on online transactions and simplifying password reset. • Keeping clients involved via SMS, mobile apps, and digital media • Minimize disagreeable surprises to customers (such as potential branch lockdowns) • Encourage fraud-prevention measures, clarify the availability of solutions on digital channels, and • Define preventive measures to ensure the health and safety of clients and employees in branches. According to McKinsey & Company, some financial institutions will need to address such technology gaps in order to offer a seamless digital customer experience. This will require planning ahead by scaling infrastructure capacity and network bandwidth, stress testing and scenario planning, managing near-term patches, and identifying urgent weaknesses in architecture. Learn more: https://capital.report/blogs/9-best-fintech-apps-to-use-while-at-home-during-the-coronavirus-lockdown/8273 All in All Coronavirus difficulties provide an opportunity for new businesses to thrive based on a new digital reality – completely digital and contactless. Digitalization has found a new meaning and it is going to reach newer areas. The world is thinking about implementing ways to lessen the disruption caused to humanity. This is the perfect time to focus on digital transformation by realizing the necessities accelerating it.

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Spotlight

ICICI Bank

ICICI Bank Ltd (NYSE:IBN) had consolidated total assets of US$ 138.7 billion at March 31, 2016. ICICI Bank's subsidiaries include India's leading private sector insurance companies and among its largest securities brokerage firms, mutual funds and private equity firms. ICICI Bank's presence currently spans 17 countries, including India.

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